How to recognise diabetes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

How to recognise diabetes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

Steve Richardson

February 2019

How to recognise diabetes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)

and hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

How to recognise diabetes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

Diabetes results in an imbalance of the levels of sugar in the blood. Commonly we see hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels) and occasionally we may see hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar levels). Non-diabetics can also experience low blood sugar levels in certain circumstances.

There is a great deal of information about Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and the general management of the illness, it can be viewed on-line, and produced / managed by the NHS. However in first aid terms we are focused on dealing with an immediate event or incident, not with long term illness management.

Common Signs of Hypo- and Hyper – glycemia

The table below show the common signs of sugar high and lows and talks about how to manage these casualties.

Diabetes chart

Understand Your Casualty’s Illness Before They Need Your Help

If you have a duty of care for a person who suffers from diabetes (or any illness for that matter), one of the best pieces of advice is to have an honest but private conversation with the person about their illness. Find out how they manage their illness and what they would like you to do, should they fall ill.  Find out what their usual signs and symptoms are, what their recovery looks like, and of course where they carry their medication.  In this way, you will be much better prepared should you find yourself dealing with a diabetic incident.

If you want to know more why not book onto one of our First Aid Courses.

 

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Written by Steve Richardson for First Aid Training North East Ltd

 

We strongly advised that you attend a Practical First Aid course to understand what to do in a medical emergency. Please visit https://firstaidtrainingnortheastltd.co.uk/contact for more information about our courses. First Aid North East Ltd provides this information for guidance and it is not in any way a substitute for medical advice. First Aid North East Ltd is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made, or actions taken based on this information.

First Aid Following an Accident

First Aid Following an Accident

Danger

  • Be aware of your surroundings and do not put yourself at risk.
  • Others will be unaware something has happened and are likely to be approaching at speed.
  • Check it is safe before starting to help
  • Secure the accident area
  • If necessary, position someone to warn people about the accident.
  • Get help, emergency numbers are 999 or 112.
  • Always start the day with a fully charged phone.

Response:

  • are they conscious?
  • If so, check if they need your help, before approaching.

If there is no response.

  • Airway – tilt their head and lift their chin and check for obvious obstruction.
  • Breathing – check for breathing.
  • If they are breathing, very carefully put them in the recovery position. .

If they are not breathing – then start CPR.

  • If they are conscious and having excluded first aid for life-threatening injuries – first aid for other injuries.
  • Circulation – cover any wounds and apply direct firm pressure to stop them bleeding.
    Ideally have a foil blanket with you as part of your first aid kit.
  • Please note that hypothermia makes it more difficult for blood to clot, conserve their body heat and insulate them from the cold.
  • Do not re position limbs you think could be broken, unless there is immediate concern about the circulation to the lower part of the limb.
  • If you are in a remote area and there may be a delay getting help.
  • If there is a lack of sensation to the casualty’s extremities or change in colour, you may need to reposition the injured limb to a neutral position to restore circulation.
  • Keep the casualty safe and warm.
  • Do not give them anything to eat or drink, especially alcohol.
  • Do not move them (unless it is absolutely necessary).
  • Alert the rescue services
  • Calling 112 will contact the emergency services when you are abroad.

Let the rescue services know:

  • location of the accident
  • number of people injured
  • type of injury

If you want to know more why not book onto one of our First Aid Courses.

 

Written by Steve Richardson for First Aid Training North East Ltd

We strongly advised that you attend a Practical First Aid course to understand what to do in a medical emergency. Please visit https://firstaidtrainingnortheastltd.co.uk/contact for more information about our courses. First Aid North East Ltd provides this information for guidance and it is not in any way a substitute for medical advice. First Aid North East Ltd is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made, or actions taken based on this information.

Applying Plasters

Applying Plasters.

In first aid you may deal with a lot of smaller injuries, for example splinters that can be removed using tweezers, or small cuts or blisters that need a plaster.

Even with small injuries, you should protect yourself and the patient by wearing gloves.

Plasters come in a variety of types and sizes and some are specially made for certain industries, for example catering plasters are blue and waterproof. Plasters are used to protect the wound from infection or further injury.

Some workplaces have plaster dispensers or special plaster boxes, all first aid kits come with a selection of plasters.

Plasters are individually wrapped and are different shapes and sizes.

After applying a plaster, check to make sure that any bleeding has stopped, if not you may need to consider using a different dressing.

Written by Steve Richardson for First Aid Training North East Ltd

We strongly advised that you attend a Practical First Aid course to understand what to do in a medical emergency. Please visit https://firstaidtrainingnortheastltd.co.uk for more information about our courses. First Aid North East Ltd provides this information for guidance and it is not in any way a substitute for medical advice. First Aid North East Ltd is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made, or actions taken based on this information.

Falls and the elderly – looking at prevention and how to help following a fall.

Falls and the elderly – looking at prevention and how to help following a fall.

Here in the UK there are more than 500,000 people aged over 65 who attend accident and emergency departments as the result of accidents at home every year – statistics show that the majority of these being from a fall.
It is recorded that over 3,500 people in England and Wales unfortunately die every year following a fall and nearly 300,000 people will need hospital treatment. It is known that many older people who suffer from falls may never fully recover from either the physical or indeed the psychological impact of their injuries. It is a very sad fact that falls are the most common cause of injury related deaths in people over the age of 75.
It is also known that the fall itself often doesn’t cause a serious injury; if the faller is unable to get themselves back up following their fall, they are statistically more likely to suffer from things such as hypothermia and pressure sores.

Asthma-Visual-description

Asthma attacks – how to avoid the back to school ‘September Surge’

Asthma – top tips to swerve the September (back to school) Surge.

In the UK there are 1.1 million children suffering with asthma. That means that each classroom in the UK has on average three children who suffering from asthma.

The number of children needing emergency treatment doubles in September compared to August. When the pupils return to school in September there is always steep rise in children being hospitalised with asthma attacks. It is recorded that in the UK a child is admitted to hospital approximately every 20 minutes because of an asthma attack.
So what could be the reason why children settling back into school find their asthma suddenly becomes unstable? And how can parents help?

Asthma

Asthma – what it is and how to help if someone is having an asthma attack?

Very few of us would know what to do if someone close by started to have a serious asthma attack and was struggling to breathe. Yet we probably all know people who have asthma. Read on to find out what asthma is, what may trigger it and how to help someone having an asthma attack?

What is asthma?
Asthma is extremely common affecting nearly 10% of children and a large number of adults too. It is a chronic and potentially life threatening condition Records show that over 25,000 emergency hospital admissions for children in the UK every year for asthma and many more when you include adult asthmatics too. It has been noted that many asthmatics find that there is a particular time of year when their asthma becomes more difficult to control, for some the cold weather is a challenge, however for many Spring is particularly difficult and again in August / September

Seizures

Seizures
It is quite common for babies and young children to experience febrile convulsions. These seizures are caused by a rising body temperature when they are unwell. These seizures are extremely frightening, both for the patient and those around, however these ones are rarely life threatening. Your child is likely to grow out of them by the time they are about 5 years old.
It is also possible for children to be diagnosed with Epilepsy and they may have been prescribed specific medication to control their seizures. They may also have additional medication to be used if a seizure continues for more than 5 minutes. Specific training is needed if staff are expected to administer this medication.

How to Treat Anaphylaxis.

How to Treat Anaphylaxis.

You do need to act quickly if anaphylaxis starts!

If you notice any or all of the following symptoms: tingling and swelling of the lips, eyes and face, itching/rash, tightening of the throat, difficulty in breathing, get them to use their auto-injector or assist them to administer it.
Call 999 or 112 for an ambulance immediately, stating ‘anaphylaxis’.

It has been recorded that one in five fatal food-allergic reactions do happen at school. It is possible that schools can now purchase emergency auto-injector treatment for anaphylaxis. This is a backup auto-injector for any child in their care who has already been prescribed these devices for anaphylaxis.
Although it is not compulsory, many schools indicate that they have welcomed this change as part of their duty of care to children at risk of anaphylaxis.
Acute allergic reactions can be life threatening. It is crucially important you recognise the problem and know what to do quickly to save a child’s life.
Avoid any known allergens. For mild allergic reactions, an antihistamine tablet or syrup can be effective but takes at least 15 minutes to work.
If you are concerned that the reaction could be systemic (all over) and life threatening, it is imperative that the use of an adrenaline auto-injector be immediate. It is far better to give adrenaline and not to have needed it, than to give it too late.

First Aid Response in Schools

First Aid Response in Schools.

We have found that with school funding being cut, moneys available for school nurses is being squeezed or indeed lost altogether. We hear from many schools that need more information about providing emergency care for children.
We have seen the four main areas of concern are: anaphylaxis, adrenaline auto-injector pens (Epipens, Jext, Emerade ), asthma and seizures.
Carry on reading for our first aid tips to respond promptly to any of these emergency situations in schools.

 

First Aid Training North East Ltd is a fully regulated First Aid Training provider; our trainers are highly experienced professionals who will tailor the training to your needs.

We run a variety of courses covering adult and child First Aid in a school setting: Paediatric First Aid covering the full Ofsted syllabus, the Fully Regulated Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW) tailored to Schools and a short 4 hour Emergency First Aid for Schools course covering CPR, choking, asthma, head injuries, minor and major bleeds, fitting and other common medical emergencies in a school setting.

We are happy to arrange bespoke courses for you on many topics and cover specific illnesses such as diabetes, asthma, seizures and acute allergic reaction.

Our website contains a wide range of free resources including posters on adrenalin auto-injector, which are available on request.
Please call, text or email our team and let us know how we can help
Tel / text: 07378 306077
Email: firstaidnortheast@gmail.com
Website: https://firstaidtrainingnortheastltd.co.uk

First Aid Training North East Ltd provides this information for guidance. It is not in any way a substitute for medical advice. First Aid Training North East Ltd is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made, or actions taken based on this information. It is strongly advised that you attend a practical First Aid course to understand what to do in a medical emergency.